Category Archives: Celebrities

2015: Best Words (#Longform)

People are writing and creating more text than at any other moment in human history. We also have myriad devices that allow us to read that text — tablets, laptops and phones which are causing us to walk to our deaths and ruin our posture — but catching up on all that reading can be daunting. (I recommend an app called Pocket.)

This year was no different. There was lots of great #content to be read, through blogs, newspapers, even Twitter.

There were lots of great pieces on sports, modern relationships, celebrities, politics and music.

Of course you can’t talk about the year in longform journalism without mentioning the demise of one of the great pop culture websites: RIP Grantland. I’ll miss it but on the bright side my daily productivity has increased 57 percent.

 

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“Swipe Right on Monogamy”

Charlotte Shane / Matter

 The problem with “only fucking” isn’t that sex is dangerous or wrong outside the confines of certain social containers like the boyfriend label or an engagement ring. It’s that in 2015 and before, casual sex, as practiced by straight Americans, was routinely bereft of physical pleasure, mutual respect, and interpersonal maturity. Hook ups were supposed to be fun but they… well, weren’t.

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“Inside Jeremy Lin’s life after Linsanity and the New York Knicks”

Pablo Torre / ESPN Magazine

Hard to believe Linsanity was over three years ago.

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“Augusta National is a Fake Southern Wonderland Inspired by Trench Warfare”

Spencer Hall / SB Nation

Hilarious take on a tradition unlike any other.

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“The Third Revelation of Father John Misty”

Sean Fennessey / Grantland

Everyone grows up eventually.

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“Ask Polly: Am I Too Smart for My Own Good?”

Heather Havrilesky / New York Magazine

All of Havrilesky’s “advice” columns are worth reading but this is the best of the bunch.

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“Has Europe Reached the Breaking Point?”

Jim Yardley / New York Times Magazine

Is the European Union experiment doomed?

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“The Late, Great Stephen Colbert”

Joel Lovell / GQ Magazine

Stephen Colbert on the eve of his Late Show takeover.

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“Ann Coulter is a Human Being”

Mitchell Sunderland / Vice Magazine

I AM VAST I CONTAIN MULTITUDES

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“How to Fix a Racist Frat”

Kate Dries / Jezebel

The kids are not alright.

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“What Kind of Person Would Vote for Donald Trump? These People”

Drew Magary / GQ Magazine

An in-depth look at the political base of our next president.

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“The Broad Strokes”

Rachel Syme / Grantland

Who says stoners are lazy?

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“A House Divided”

Ryan Lizza / The New Yorker

Inside the plot against John Beohner and the battle for the conservative soul of the U.S. House of Representatives.

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“The Katrina Disaster That Hasn’t Ended”

Michael Grunwald / Politico

This was the 10-year anniversary of Hurricane Katrina and for the occasion lots of people wrote retrospectives. I didn’t read many of them because I suspected they were overly sentimental or about jazz and New Orlean’s resiliency or George W. Bush, which is fine of course. But this article tackles a problem that played perhaps the largest role in the death and destruction resulting from that terrible storm: the self-serving relationship between Congress and the Army Corps of Engineers.

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“Out of Bethlehem”

Louis Menand / The New Yorker

How the greatest writer of her generation became a radical.

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“The Public Life and Private Doubts of Al Sharpton”

Eli Saslow / The Washington Post

Sharpton in Winter.

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“Against Chill”

Alana Massey / Matter

For well you know that it’s a fool who plays it cool
By making his world a little colder

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“Praise Kaitlyn Bristowe

Jada Yuan / New York Magazine

Let’s talk about sex, baby.

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“How to be a Friend Indeed”

Bruce Feiler / The New York Times

Practical advice on how to be a friend to those in crises.

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“The True Story Behind ‘Zola,’ the Epic Twitter Story Too Crazy to be Real”

Caitlin Dewey / The Washington Post

Background on the greatest story every written 140 characters at a time.

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“Sea of Crises”

Bryan Phillips / Grantland

Sometimes it’s all about the journey, ya know.

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“Da Art of Storytellin’ (A Prequel)”

Kiese Laymon / The Oxford American

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Taylor Swift’s New York Sanitation

Nostalgia
Nostalgia

This week 24-year old pop superstar and New York Global Ambassador Taylor Swift dropped 1989, her highly anticipated fifth studio album. I like it. It is a great album. Catchy, polished, well-crafted song writing. I’ve been listening to it a lot.

There’s a ton of good stuff here. “Blank Space,” “Style,” “All You Had to Do Was Stay,” are the best kind of earworms. Even “Shake it Off” is infectious (like Ebola, according to one friend). And “New Romantics” ends the record on a strong note. Nearly every song is a pop music banger.

But really I just want to talk about this album opener, “Welcome to New York.”

This song is absolutely grating.

It is but one more addition to a long list of paeans to the Big Apple. It instantly recalls New York’s last great anthem (which is already a half-decade old). Of course I’m talking about Jay Z’s 2009 hit, “Empire State of Mind.” The first time I heard it I detested it. It was mawkish and cloying, faux-inspirational. Grantland’s Alex Pappademas put it best:

It’s Jay’s sentimental streak teaming up with his bottomless cynicism to beat you over the head with a foam Yankees no. 1 finger full of silver dollars. It’s not a song, it’s a Statue of Liberty keychain, a double-decker bus tour of famous crack spots that ends at Magnolia Cupcakes, a silver shovel throwing dirt on a mass grave full of poor people.

It’s almost as if he knew he’d be performing it at the World Series as he wrote it. But somehow I came around on “Empire.” Maybe because it’s catchy. And maybe because even though this song is basically a tourism board approved jingle, it does have subversive references to stash spots, drug dealing and at least acknowledges that everything isn’t all good in the city and hey, McDonald’s!

And while Jay hits you with a cynical radio jab, Taylor commits her own act of violence here. Though her weapon of choice is a sledgehammer of naive optimism whacking you flush on your right temple. No one doubts Taylor’s sincerity. It’s not hard to imagine Swift fresh off her plane from Nashville, hopping in her cab limo and finishing writing this song before the end of her ride from JFK to her new apartment down in TriBeCa.

And melody-wise, the song isn’t half bad. But really, the rub comes at the chorus:

Welcome to New York
Welcome to New York
It’s been waiting for you!

This is a lie. New York most certainly has not been waiting for you. In fact, New York City does not give a single solitary fuck if you come there or not. New York does not care about you. It was there (and great) hundreds of years before you and it will likely be there (and great) long after your bones are resting in the cold hard ground. I moved from New York 18 months ago and so far I haven’t received one phone call from New York asking me to come back because it misses me.

Presuming that New York has been waiting for you is like me crashing a party at Beyonce’s house and then apologizing to everyone there for being late.

This song is practically unrecognizable to a rapidly increasing size of New York’s population. It certainly isn’t recognizable to me. This is not Chinatown Bus music. This is not broken radiator music. This is not fifth floor walk-up music. This is not rent court music. It’s not even empty out your savings account to cover your broker fee because your student loan money hasn’t come in yet music. No, this is post-Sex and the City, pre-Great Recession music.

It’s not the New York of the overeducated and underemployed. If that’s the New York you’re looking for, you want Awkwafina’s “NYC Bitche$,” the anti- “Welcome to New York.”

No, “Welcome to New York” is a romantic song devoid of any allusion to struggle. Since its release last week a lot of writers and creative types have panned it, which isn’t surprising. Because if anyone knows what it’s like to struggle in New York City, it’s a writer or creative type. But this song isn’t for them. It was penned by someone who’s moved there after already experiencing wild success; someone who’s sold over 30 million albums worldwide and stands to earn $64 million in 2014, alone.

But no matter how much I hate this song, we all know how this ends. In ten years, you’ll hear it playing over a montage from Central Park West, the 100 million dollar grossing rom-com starring a rehabilitated Amanda Bynes. And then Swift plays it to a sold out Citi Field when the Mets make the World Series.

Of course I’m kidding. The Mets will never make the World Series. Then again, anything is possible in Taylor Swift’s New York.

101 Problems: Is This the End of Bey Z?

Jay and Bey on the run
“Sometimes I trip on how happy we could be.”

Rumors began swirling once more this week about the future marital status of America’s Favorite Couple, Bey Z. It was reported in the New York Post that after the couple’s On the Run Tour ends the two will be going their separate ways. Apparently months of marriage counseling haven’t helped and the couple is just going through the motions until a more convenient time to split. Having long heard whispers of infidelity and marital strife, I wrote it off as tabloid nonsense… but lately the rumors have been getting more difficult to ignore.

Jay Z and Beyonce are two very shrewd and image savvy public figures. Could this be an attempt to generate publicity for their tour and subsequent concert film? There is a side of me that is both cynical and naive enough to believe this. But here’s the thing: When have Bey Z ever had to manufacture controversy just to court attention? Hell, Jay Z removed the hyphen from his name and it fed the blogosphere for over a week. Such is the power of Hov and Bey.

My first inclination is to hyperventilate and yell the same thing everyone thinks when they learn a favorite celebrity couple is splitting… “Well if they can’t make it WE ARE ALL DOOMED!” But the truth of the matter is– despite the many hours I’ve spent listening to their music– I really don’t know shit about either of them. Oh, I know far more about them than they’ll ever know about me because our relationship is completely asymmetric. As are all fan/celebrity relationships. As much as I love The Blueprint, if I ever approached Jay Z to tell him as much, his bodyguard would snap my wrist in half before I could shake Jay Z’s hand.

Divorces are sad (well, kinda). And relationships are difficult which is why most of them end. That doesn’t stop me from being genuinely upset that Blue Ivy may not grow up with her parents together. But the fact still remains that these people, as my mom would say, “don’t know me from Adam’s house cat.”

I’m not willing to declare that love is dead just because a wealthy, powerful couple has made the decision to call it quits. Over the previous twelve years Jay and Bey have seemed liked the ideal loving couple. But lately their marriage has displayed more struggle than fans trying to keep up with the key changes in “Love on Top.”

It sure is going to be awkward when that On The Run concert film comes out in September. You know how it is when you run into someone you haven’t seen in a while and they innocently ask how your girlfriend is doing, not knowing you broke up a few weeks before. Well it’s going to be like that, but 100x more unpleasant.

It’s important to once again remember that these are just rumors and yet I can’t help speculating on the possible causes of the split. Was it infidelity? Irreconcilable differences? Maybe they couldn’t find a way for their massive egos to co-exist? Maybe they are two assholes who can no longer stand each other? The tour doesn’t end until another two months (!) but we still may never know.

And after all the think pieces about power, fame, wealth and its utter futility in keeping couples together, I’m still not sure we will have learned anything new. Because really we already know the lesson: Keeping a promise to someone that you’ll feel the same way about them for the rest of your life is incredibly difficult. And if Jay and Bey can’t do it… well, it says absolutely nothing about your ability to.